Cincinnati / Northern Kentucky International Airport

HOME

/

Part 150

/

Master Plan

/

Public Involvement

/

Project Schedule

/

Links

/

Contacts

/

Glossary

 
Print Friendly Version

ISSUES SPECIFIC TO CVG

 

While the general goal of a Part 150 Study is to reduce noise impacts, it is important to understand the specific issues that are faced at CVG before moving forward.

 

The KCAB has prepared three previous Part 150 Studies over the last 13 years to address the specific conditions present at the airport at that time. Each Part 150 Study reviewed the previous noise compatibility plan and revised measures, removed measures, and added new measures where necessary. Since the last Part 150 Study was approved (Dec 5, 2002), a number of events have occurred that require a fresh look at the current operating procedures and the land use mitigation programs. These include:

The economic slowdown since 2001 and the airlines' response: The economy began to slow in growth in early 2001. The events of September 11, 2001 hastened and increased the impact of this slowdown on the nation's airlines. In response to these events, airlines began cutting costs by reducing service and laying off employees. Another trend was a shift towards the use of regional jet aircraft in place of larger jet aircraft, due to reduced demand and lower operating costs. At CVG, Delta Air Lines, while affected by these same events, continued to remain relatively strong in large part due to the presence of its regional jet partner Comair. One result of growing the Comair portion of Delta's service at CVG was an increase in Comair departures between 10:00 p.m. and Midnight.

 

The increase in operations between 10:00 p.m. and Midnight at CVG: The current noise abatement procedures include a nighttime runway use program that is designed to focus as much of the nighttime (10:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m.) activity to the west of the airport. This program was developed in 1992 and introduced runway preferences in descending order for nighttime flights.

 

Arrivals Step-Down

Departure Step-Down

Rwy 9

Rwy 27

Rwy 27

Rwy 36L

Rwy 36L

Rwy 9

Rwy 18R

Rwy 18R

 

The runway use program was designed for the type of activity that occurred at the airport in 1992 during the hours of 10:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. From 1992 through 2001 that activity remained relatively consistent in nature. During the 10:00 p.m. to Midnight period Delta's last arrival banks were landing. DHL Airways landed their aircraft from Midnight to 2:00 a.m. and departed their aircraft between 4:00 a.m. and 6:00 a.m. Delta began early morning departures between 6:00 a.m. and 7:00 a.m. On a typical night, the majority of the arrivals would use Runway 9, landing over the area to the west of the airport. Likewise, the majority of the time, departures would use Runway 27, taking off over the area west of the airport. These procedures work most effectively when aircraft are either only arriving or only departing at the airport, because safety guidelines do not allow aircraft to fly head-to-head.

 

The runway use program was not designed to handle "mixed" operations (both arrivals and departures occurring at the airport at the same time and in relatively equal numbers). Due to the growth of the Comair departures during the 10:00 p.m. to Midnight period (discussed above), the Air Traffic Control Tower (ATCT) continued to use Runway 27 as the preferred departure runway, but since there were arrivals at the same time the ATCT could not use Runway 9 and began using Runway 27 more heavily for arrivals during 10:00 p.m. and Midnight. This procedure of using one runway for both arrivals and departures works with just a few operations, but begins to result in increased delay as more and more operations occur during that period of time.

 

The growth in operations during the 10:00 p.m. and Midnight period has resulted in the FAA testing new nighttime runway use procedures to increase efficiency and safety at the airport. The results of these tests will be included in the Part 150 Study along with other variations to the nighttime runway use program developed in the Part 150 Study.

 

The Relocation of DHL Airways to Wilmington: Recently, DHL Airways announced their decision to relocate their cargo operations to Wilmington, Ohio by November 2005. The result of this decision in the short term will be a dramatic reduction in the overall number of nighttime (10:00 p.m. - 7:00 a.m.) flights at the airport. However, the KCAB will continue to explore opportunities with other cargo carriers to serve CVG. It is anticipated that by 2010, the out-year for the Part 150 Study, nighttime cargo activity will have returned to the level that currently exists today with DHL, both in terms of number of flights, type of aircraft, and time of flights. By assuming that DHL’s operation will be replaced with other cargo operators by 2010, the KCAB is taking a worse-case approach to noise abatement planning. Noise abatement procedures developed for this Part 150 will be designed to both accommodate this level and type of activity and to help minimize the noise impacts.

 

Return to Top

 

 

CVG Public Site Home Page